How do animals respond to a change in their habitat?

6th June, 2011 - Posted by Sammie Gann - 38 Comments

Students conduct a simple experiment to test three animal’s (millipedes, fiddler crabs, and dwarf african frogs) responses to a sudden change in one condition of their habitats: light. Working in groups, students predict, test, observe, and record each animal’s behavioral response to the environmental change. Join this fourth grade class of scientists as they investigate lesson 10 in STC™ » Read More

What good is vermicompost? Make predictions and check your results while you visit with Sunny the Sunflower.

21st March, 2011 - Posted by Sammie Gann - No Comments

Now that you have your compost made, what do you do with it? This nutrient rich soil provides a great environment for plants to grow.  Does a strawberry plant grow better in vermicompost or regular soil? Make predictions and compare your results while you visit with Sunny the Sunflower.  What other variables could you change » Read More

What’s up with puddles? Plan your own experiment about evaporation!

14th July, 2010 - Posted by Sammie Gann - 1 Comment

Kids are always up for investigating rain puddles. Carolina™ Curriculum has designed an activity to help students generate an investigable question and then plan an experiment. Use a graphic novel from Carolina’s Science Magnifier™ (Yellow Dot, for grades 2–3) as an attention-grabbing starting point. Then download and use an activity sheet to guide students through » Read More

Use a science notebook to gather and interpret data!

27th April, 2010 - Posted by Sammie Gann - No Comments

Thanks to the BBC for sharing this game with us! Making observations and using data that you collect during science inquiry experiments is an important piece to include in your science notebook. From observations, you collect data, make drawings and illustrations, make charts and graphs, and comment on what you observed or learned.  Use the PDF science » Read More

Free graphing program for science data collection

28th February, 2010 - Posted by Sammie Gann - 3 Comments

When collecting scientific data during an inquiry experiment it is always valuable to record your observations in the form of a graph.  This free software allows students to record their data in a variety of graphs and print out the graph in the computer lab or classroom.  Think about recording plant growth in the early » Read More